Świecie Translated from the Słownik Geograficzny (1880-1902)
by Helen Bienick

Świecie is a village in the county of Brodnica. In 1291 it was known as Schwetz in German, and in 1378 was called Swetczia. The village was a large expanse of land on which stood a Teutonic Knights’ castle, and located on the Drwęca river. The town of Brodnica was 9.5 kilometers distant. The post office and the telegraph station were in Brodnica, which also had a German colony and settlers. The Catholic parish church was located in the neighboring village of Pokrzydowo. The village covered 549 ha [1] of land, of which 338 ha were fertile farms, 51 were meadows and 43 were forests. In 1885, there were 9 buildings and 23 houses. The population numbered 104 inhabitants, of whom 79 were Catholics and 25 were Evangelicals. The village had a distillery, a water mill, and a dairy farm with 50 to 60 Holland cattle. The farmers engaged in the growing of hops. In 1885, the village was the property of Ernest Abramowski.

A large expanse of unused land near the village marked the boundary between Mazowsze and the Prussian district of Lubawa. It was given to the Bishops of Płock in 1252 by Konrad, the count of Kujawa and Łęczycza. This unused land was partially in Świecie and Ruzia. Permission was granted to farm the land and conduct fairs and markets, rights to hunt and own inns, and to establish a court.

In 1291, Bishop Tomasz of Płock mandated that Werner, bishop of Chełm, release 30 fields to the Bishops of Płock for the purpose of adjusting the boundary with Lubawa and straightening the border. This edict affected the portion of Świecie which was close to where the Brynica entered the river Drwęca. The decree is fully described in a publication of Ulanowski, pages 158, 163, 164 paragraphs 11, 19, 20. It is also documented in U.B. of Culm #124 page 88, and a second time in 1378 on page 171.

During the time of the Teutonic Knights, Świecie was a part of the estate of the Chief Knight in Brodnica. In 1446, Conrad v. Erlichhausen, granted Alfer 11½ “włok” (about 340 morgen of land), with the conditions that he serve in the army in full military attire, assist in building the town and pay a tribute of one bushel each of wheat and rye, one pound of wax and one German fenig. This decree is described in Gesch. D. Stadt. u. des Kr. Kulm von Schultz 11 page 104.

In 1450, Ludwik v. Erlichhausen granted to Ludwik from Sosna and Jan Kalkstein the right to establish in Świecie a governing system on the order of the Magdeburg laws as practiced in Germany, incorporating a lower and higher court. They were also required to serve in the military and assist in building the town. In 1415 there were 23 farm owners paying a tax of three Polish coins, yet only four “włoki” (120 morgen) were under cultivation, as documented on page 112, in the Gesch. D. Stadt. u. des Kr. Kulm mentioned previously.

According to the records of losses kept by the Teutonic Knights in 1414, Świecie incurred losses amounting to 500 grzywien (a Polish coin) in the latest battles with the Knights.

In 1667 after his visitation, Strzesza, a bishop, states that the benefactors of Świecie were the noblemen Andreae Głowinski, Michaelis Dziedzicki, Michaelis Ciborski and Christiphori Maluski.

[1] “Ha” plural for hectare, which is equivalent to 2.47 acres.


Świecie Surnames from FHL film #531372, compiled by Renay Wallace
Ankiewicz
Bakonowice
Baranowski
Barulski
Bejger
Blocki
Blondowski
Bohaniewicz
Bojanowski
Brozdiewicz
Brzozowski
Dabrowski
Domzalski
Dressler
Dumzalski
Dunalski
Fabiszewski
Gajewski
Golszakiewicz
Gorecki
Jonka
Kalinowski
Kaminski
Karulski
Kopistecki
Kowalski
Kozlowski
Krakowski
Krasmnienrowski
Lewandowski
Lukaszewski
Malinowski
Myslinski
Noga
Ostrowski
Schmidt
Sliwinski
Wallarska
Wisniewski
Wojciechowski
Wrozkowska
Wydrzynski
Zalewski
Zandrowski
Ziebinska
Zielinski
Ziolkowski

Events
PGS-CA Meeting
Election Day!

November 18, 2017

Reminder:
This will be the 3rd Saturday in November (Due to Thanksgiving weekend being the 4th weekend).

Speaker:
Linda Serna

Topic:
“Tales to Docs to Stories: Building Your Family Story from Family Tales and Documents”

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