Previously published in PGS-CA Bulletin (April 2013)

Jeżewo Translated from the Słownik Geograficzny (1880-1902)
by Helen Bienick

Jeżewo, in German Jeszewo, also Jeschewo, a church village, parish and estate, in the county of Świecie, lies beyond Lake Stelchno. Near the forests by the village runs a railroad line to Bydgoszcz and Tczew. It consisted of two sections:

1) The village owned by the church, covered 2,792 morgen of land, with 12 buildings, 6 houses with 262 Catholics and 113 Evangelicals. The village had a parish church and school; the post office and railroad station were in Laskowice.

2) The estates and farms belonging to the village residents consisted of 12 buildings and 6 houses, with 58 Catholics and 8 Evangelicals. From olden times the village was the holding of the Bishops of Kujawa, who owned most of this area in Pomerania, By whom and when they were granted this privilege is unknown, but it may have been the nobles who lived in Pomerania. In 1293,Duke Mestwin II permitted Bishop Wisław to build a dam on the stream running between Jeżewo and Taszewo, and the construction of a water mill. In 1338 both these villages engaged in a dispute which involved the borders of the lakes Clidno, Plesno majus (major) and Plesno minus (minor). In 1412, Maciej Szkoda, an official in Jeżewo, appeared before Bishop Jan, complaining that a document establishing land rights was lost in the last war. The Bishop's Chancery was unable to locate a copy of the above document. In a settlement he was awarded 4 fields. The village in itself covered a total of 41 fields. He was also appointed as a labor aid to the bishop. Farm owners paid a so called "Toruń Tax", which was equivalent to about 7.90 marks. Maciej Szkoda paid a tax on the harvest from his fields. In addition to the Toruń tax, the farmers also paid a tithe of 2 bushels of oats and 2 chickens from each farm. During the days of the Reformation, the village farms and fields began to revert to private ownership.

In 1580, the documents concerning the visitation of the bishop, state that the owner of the village at that time was Maciej Niewiescinski, In later years, the village again became the property of the Bishops. In 1760, the inventory book of the bishop states that the village belonged to the deanery of Komórsk. The bishop's manor house and estate consisted of 3 fields and 28 morgen of land. The forest was ruined, but the local pastor still had a small forest of pine. The village owned 5 lakes, called Krukwie, Strzemięntowo, Jeżewko, Plesno and Pleszewko. After the partitions, the Prussians grabbed the village and passed it on to private ownership. The schematics of the diocese show that the Jeźewo parish consisted of 2315 souls; the church was named in honor of The Holy Trinity. Nothing is known of its origins, or by whom it was funded. The present church was rebuilt in 1824, by the pastor Łakomecki and dedicated by him on the Sunday after the feast of St. Michael. The parish served the following villages: Jeźewo, Lipinki, Węzowiec, Piskarki, Lipna, Bełno, Bedlenko, Laskowice, Nowe Laskowice, Buczek, Krąglewice, Nowe Krąglewice, Taszewo, Taszewko, Taszewko pole, Ostrów, Lasy, Ciemnik, Węglarki, Plęsno, Grzyspa, Dubielno, Wilcze Błota, Biała, Białe Błota, Nowy Młyn, Leństwo, Długoleszcz, Pięcmórg, Wymysłowo, Jaszcze, Nowe Jaszcze, Kwiatki, Czersk, Łęgnowo, Buszyn, Krudonki taszewskie, Skrzynki.


Surnames from Jeżewo, Film # 0587546, Compiled by Renay Wallace
Andrzejewski
Babinski
Bogacki
Brzeski
Bubola
Czerwinski
Ciechanowski
Dolewski
Dudkowski
Golinski
Gołębiewski
Gorski
Grabowski
Jankoski
Kocik
Konik
Kośinski
Kowalski
Kwiatkowski
Lewandowski
Lipinski
Majewski
Makowski
Malinowski
Modzieleski
Murawski
Nadólny
Nagorski
Nowicki
Odrowski
Ostrowski
Ośmielewski
Pawłowski
Piekarski
Rośinski
Słomski
Śmigel
Strozinski
Swiderski
Świerski
Topolinski
Wojda
Wróblewski
Zaremba
Żielinski

Events
PGS-CA Meeting
Election Day!

November 18, 2017

Reminder:
This will be the 3rd Saturday in November (Due to Thanksgiving weekend being the 4th weekend).

Speaker:
Linda Serna

Topic:
“Tales to Docs to Stories: Building Your Family Story from Family Tales and Documents”

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