Previously published in PGS-CA Bulletin (April 2013)

Bzowo Translated from the Słownik Geograficzny (1880-1902)
by Helen Bienick

Bzowo, in German known as Gross-Sibsau, a village with a Catholic church and school, also a civil government office, is located in the county of Świecie. The post office and the telegraph station were in the town of Warlubie, about 3 kilometers distant. A large noble family holding covered 914.29 ha [1] of land, of which 504 was fertile farmland, and 359 ha were forests. In the late 1800s there were 30 houses with 377 inhabitants, of whom 317 were Catholics. The town had a distillery and a brick making kiln. The land belonging to the inhabitants covered 1228.53 morgen [2] of land with 39 houses and 308 inhabitants, of whom 280 were Catholics. The nobility owned large farmsteads (folwarks) called Birkenrode and the Chełmiński of Bzowo. These farmsteads had 7 houses, with 51 inhabitants of whom 44 were Catholics. There were dairies and dairy farms in Bzowo and the village of Krusze, which covered 676 ha of land. A small settlement called Bzowko, also belonging to the parish in Bzowo, covered 328 morgen of land, with 15 houses and 95 inhabitants, of whom 4 were Catholics.

The following description is from an unknown source.

The brick church dedicated to St. Margaret, is part of the deanery of Nowe, and has been in existence since 1768. Next to it stood a hospital funded by the Castellan Borowski, along with a home for the poor established in 1857.

The following villages were included in the parish of Bzowo: Bzowo, Brzeźiny, Bzowko, Osiek (Komerau) Kompania, Krusze, Pletnowo, Bojanowo, Grupa Górna, Grupa Dolna, and Piła. In 1867, the parish totaled 783 souls, with 491 communicants. In 1888, the count showed 986 souls. On the eastern side of town, not far from the so-called “Góra Zamkowa" (Castle Hill), lies an old burial ground. Excavations uncovered many old chests, boxes, ashes, and other antiquities. These items are described and explained by the writer Ossowski in his book, on pages 38 and 76. We first encounter the village in 1295 when the Bishop of Kujawa, named Wisław, first annexed it into the parish church of Komórsk, as described on page 468 in the P.U.B., by von Perlbach. In 1305, the father of King Wacław III, issued a decree supporting the military actions of the Teutonic Knights, which mentions the village of Bzowo, as per the writings of Zubesow, page 559 in his book. In the times of the Teutonic Knights and their escapades, Bzowo was the property of the chieftains of Grudziądz. During a pastoral visit by Bishop Strzesa in 1710, documents show that Bzowo was incorporated into the county office in Grudziądz. The local pastor owned 4 fields and the church owned the lake called Głowinek. At one time the parish was administered by the pastor from Komórsk, who visited every third Sunday to conduct the religious services, as stated in the schematics of the diocese on page 189.

In 1773, there were 200 inhabitants, living in 40 houses, of whom half were Catholic, and half were Evangelicals. The following pastors at one time served the church, Franciszek Grotkowski in 1639, Andrzej Robakowski in 1710, Teofil Grzembski in 1783, Kazimierz Gruśinski in 1869 and Mateusz Bolemow in 1767.

[1] One morgen/mg. = ~2.116 acres

[2] ha, plural for hectare, = to 2.47 acres


Surnames from Bzowo, 1833-1920 Film # 0587539, Compiled by Renay Wallace
Bablinski
Barek
Bukowski
Chabowski
Czajka
Czerwinski
Donajski
Dworacki
Felski
Fijalek
Górski
Grajewski
Jabłonski
Jankiewicz
Kalach
Kaminiski
Klimek
Kocik
Kozlowski
Krzyźanowski
Kuberski
Kurowski
Kwiatkowski
Laskowski
Leyda
Maciejewski
Maślankowski
Matuszewski
Murawski
Muszynski
Niedzielski
Nowicki
Piechowski
Piotrowski
Potocki
Radziejewski
Rogowski
Słupski
Śmigielski
Trochowski
Urbanski
Walewski
Wilewski
Winklarz
Wojciehowski
Wróblewski
Zakrzewski
Zaręba
Źielinski

Events
PGS-CA Meeting
Election Day!

November 18, 2017

Reminder:
This will be the 3rd Saturday in November (Due to Thanksgiving weekend being the 4th weekend).

Speaker:
Linda Serna

Topic:
“Tales to Docs to Stories: Building Your Family Story from Family Tales and Documents”

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